A Year in Millinery Fashion 1864

In this demi-season, when there is a perfect stagnation of fashion, and when milliners and dressmakers lament that there is positively nothing new, we find at Mme. N. Tilman’s, of Ninth Street, a choice lot of new importations.

Among the bonnets was a very peculiar one of black tulle, with scarlet velvet front, and the crown was formed of one large scarlet velvet carnation pick. The inside trimming was of scarlet carnations, and the strings of scarlet and black striped ribbon, quite Scotch-like, and a novelty; for until now plain ribbons alone have been tolerated for bonnet strings. The length of the strings should be one yard and three-quarters. Another very exquisite bonnet was of felt-colored velvet trimmed with aigrette of blonde lace and a heron plume. Inside more Scotch flowers, consisting of tufts of scarlet, green, and blue berries with gold spikes, interwoven with golden veined ivy. The tout ensemble of this bonnet was very charming. (Godey’s, March, 1864)

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4 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Ooo, I like these descriptions.

    Do you think that each separate bonnet string would be 1 ¾ yds? That seems long! Perhaps it is referring to the total length of both bonnet strings?

    Best,
    Quinn

  2. I tend to think so. I plan for the ribbons to be a yard on each side. With an ‘ear wide’ bow, the ribbon falls to not quite my waist. (Please picture me tieing a bow with my measuring tape to double check.) While I have seen Very long ribbons, I don’t think that was the norm.

  3. Lol, yes I can envision that! Waist length (or so) does sound more reasonable to me.

    Best,
    Quinn

  4. It is a very good thing a measureing tape can be tied in a bow.


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