Winter Millinery of 1864

Bonnets are now worn quite small, though not the marvels of disolnation [sic] we sometimes hear of. They are proportioned in size to the head and features of the wearer. Where the curtain is abandoned, it is replaced by loop of ribbon and falls of lace, so tastefully arranged that the curtain, which generally gives the style to the bonnet, is scarcely missed. We cannot resist describing some charming bonnets from the establishment of that fashionable artiste, Mme. Tilman, of 148 East 9th Street, New York.

A snowflake like bonnet, suitable for visiting or reception, was of white royal velvet, with soft, drooping crown, covered with falls of marabout fringe. Inside were clusters of half-blown roses, bedded in a mass of white tulle.

Another was a puffed tulle, with hanging crown and covered with soft blonde lace, loops of rose-colored velvet, and tufts of forget-me-nots. On the edge of the front was a tulle scarf, which tied under the chin, and took the place of the quilled side caps.

A very graceful bonnet was of violin crepe, with a wreath of autumn leaves and mulberries placed round the crown, and tied at the back with a ribbon and long ends.

Another evening bonnet was very tastefully trimmed with fuchsias round the crown. The face trimming was formed of a fringe of fuchsias, falling over a plait of tulle. The effect of this was charming.

For the street were velvets of rich, soft shades, trimmed with plumes or flowers, some having net crowns of narrow velvet, arranged loosely over white crepe of silk.

The prejudice against the mixture of blue and green no longer exists, and we find this combination in flowers, feathers, ribbons, and, in fact, in all kinds of goods. (Godey’s, December, 1864)

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Published in: on December 22, 2014 at 1:01 am  Leave a Comment  
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A Year in Millinery Fashion – 1864

Violet purple silk bonnet, trimmed with white lace, black feathers, and pink roses.

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  Bonnet of white pressed silk, trimmed with a scarf of black lace and a tuft of scarlet feathers and black grasses. The inside trimming is of black lace and scarlet roses. The strings are of scarlet ribbon.

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The short veils, of which we have before spoken as mask veils, but more appropriately termed by the Parisians muzzles, are now universally worn on both hats and bonnets. They are of thread or guipure lace, or else of tulle or spotted net, trimmed with chenille or bugle fringe, or else are hemmed over a colored ribbon.

Published in: on November 24, 2014 at 1:01 am  Leave a Comment  
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A Year in Millinery Fashion – 1864

Left – The bonnet is trimmed with a row of daisies around the edge. The crown is formed of loops of ribbon and flowers, and a fall of white lace takes the place of a curtain.

Center – A fall bonnet of blonde lace constitutes the curtain. The inside trimming is of blonde lace and a small scarlet feather.

Right – White bonnet, trimmed with black lace. A black feather is laid over the front, an on the right side where the black feather is fastened is a large tuft of pink roses. 1

Published in: on November 21, 2014 at 1:01 am  Leave a Comment  
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A Year in Millinery Fashion – 1864

Bonnet for light mourning. The front is black velvet. The crown is soft and formed of white tulle, which is covered with a fanchon of black and white plaid silk, edged with bugle fringe. On the left side of the crown is a spray of white flowers. The cape is of black velvet, trimmed with a bias band of plaid silk. The inside trimming is of pearl color, and white flowers, and white. (Godey’s, November, 1864)

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  Black velvet bonnet, timed with white silk edged with black lace. On the front is a large white flower, surrounded with scarlet velvet leaves. The inside trimming is of scarlet velvet and black lace. (Godey’s, November, 1864)

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 Bonnet for light mourning. The front is of black silk. The crown and cape of white silk covered with black lace. The flowers, both outside and in, are of violet velvet. (Godey’s, November, 1864)

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Published in: on November 17, 2014 at 1:01 am  Leave a Comment  
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A Year in Millinery Fashion – 1864

White silk curtainless bonnet, timed with black velvet, black lace, large black beads, and sprays of orange-colored velvet flowers.

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Evening bonnet of white crepe, trimmed with mauve feathers. A fall of blonde lace loops of mauve velvet take the place of a cape. A tulle veil ties under the chin, and is a substitute for the side caps. Over the forehead is a pink rose, with buds and leaves. (Godey’s, December, 1864)

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Published in: on November 15, 2014 at 1:01 am  Leave a Comment  
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A Year in Millinery Fashion – 1854

Left – White [unent] velvet bonnet, with white plume.

Center – bonnet of white plush, with soft crown of purple velvet. The trimming is composed of purple velvet and scarlet and white flowers

Right White corded silk bonnet, trimmed with jet black feathers, a purple tip, and fancy grasses. (November Godey’s 1864)

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Published in: on November 10, 2014 at 1:01 am  Leave a Comment  
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A Year in Millinery Fashion – 1864

Bonnets without curtains have not quite won the day yet. It is true they do not suit every one, and should not be adopted without exception. It is absolutely necessary to have a large quantity of hair, either natural or added by the coiffeur, in order that the bonnet may look well at the back without its ordinary appendage, over a full chignon, a simple fall of lace, or even a sprig of flowers or bow of ribbon, looks well; but the case is totally different when there is little or no hair at the back, and an empty space is left between the edge of the bonnet and the next. It is, therefore, to be understood that ladies no longer young and addicted to caps, or those who have not adopted the modern and elaborate style of dressing the hair, should net think of wearing a bonnet of the curtainless description, yet the curtain should be very small. The top of the bonnet now bends down slightly toward the forehead. The sides are fluted and very full-trimmed inside.

Veils of colored gauze are very popular. They are quite small, round, and trimmed with a quilling of gauze. For white and black lace veils, fringes of chenille, jet, or straw are worn. (Peterson’s, November 1864)

Published in: on November 8, 2014 at 1:01 am  Leave a Comment  
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A Year in Millinery Fashion – 1854

Left – Curtainless bonnet. Gray chip bonnet, trimmed with scarlet daises. A fall of black lace is arranged for the crown, over which is a bow of scarlet velvet. Scarlet daisies and black lace form the inside trimming.

Right – Fancy gray straw bonnet, having the crown covered with blue hanging flowers. (Godey’s, October, 1864)

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A Year in Millinery Fashion – 1864

1 White corded silk front, with puffed silk crown edged with black velvet ribbon, which is fastened inside the front of the bonnet, is carried to the centre of the crown, where it finishes in a point from which to hang clusters of grapes with foliage. Inside trimming is of tulle, scarlet velvet, and purple grapes. 1

2 Eve bonnet of puffed white tulle, with small pointed cape. The front edge of the bonnet and cape are edged with a double row of Marquerites. The same flower, mingled with tulle, foems the inside trimming. 2

3 The front of the bonnet is of quilted gray silk. The crown is soft, and of plain silk crossed with black velvet. Deep blue flowers are arranged on the lower part of the crown, and instead of the curtain are loops of ribbon and lace. The inside trimming is of tulle, black lace, and blue flowers. 3

4 Bonnet formed of rows of violine-colored ribbon, arranged in points. The outside is trimmed with a half wreath of lilies of the vally and a violine-colored feather. The inside trimming is of violine velvet and white flowers. 4

5 Reception bonnet of white royal velvet, with a short cape formed of two rows of blonde. On the outside are white camelias with scarlet velvet leaves. Inside are blonde caps, small white flowers, with coral centres and scarlet leaves. 5

White silk bonnet, with crown of Azurline blue velvet. On the edge of the bonnet is a roll which is strapped with narrow blue velvet. Inside is a very large cluster of blue daisies and grasses. Daisies and grasses are also arranged on the outside of the bonnet. 6

Published in: on November 1, 2014 at 1:01 am  Comments (2)  
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A Year in Millinery Fashion – 1864

Bonnet for light mourning. The front is of black silk, with a fall of chenille fringe drooping over the front. The crown and cape are of white silk, trimmed with a chenille fanchon. The inside trimming is white roses, black grass, and white tulle. (Godey’s, October, 1864)

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  Bonnet of white silk, with puffed front and cap crown. The cape is very short, and raised on the right side it display a rose and bud. A bunch of roses with leaves is placed over the crown. Roses and black velvet with blonde are arranged as an inside trimming. (Godey’s, October, 1864)

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