Work Bags from the 1st Sew Along

Now that the final directions for the first 2016 Sew Along have been shared, photos of finished work bags are coming in. Here are just a few of the bags made in the past month and a half.

 

Published in: on February 12, 2016 at 6:00 am  Comments (3)  

A Couple New Things

***First… The glitches…. I am sorry. WordPress has made a bunch of changes lately. There is something quirking about the scheduling/publishing box. Thank you for your patience and humor.***

Goodreads

I must confess, I have previously failed to bridge the gap between my enjoyment reading and the modern world. Not only do I still listen to my audiobooks on CD, I have failed to make good use of Goodreads.

Silly? Likely. After all, Fanciful Utility has been listed there since publication.

I’ve decided to make better use of the Goodreads site.

As I mentioned, FanU has been there for a while now. Paisley, Plaid, & Purled is newly listed. Both could use a little help in their reviews. As I write, FanU has 6 and PP&P has none. (I’ll work on getting From Field to Fashion there as well.)

Please, take a moment to hop over to Goodreads to rate and review each, if you have read them.

 

LiveBinder

I need to learn a few online teaching programs for work. As I am one who learns best by doing and one of them is available publicly, I will be looking for a few volunteers. Each person will need to be willing to look at the LiveBinder I am putting together and give written feedback about the technology. The LiveBinder will have a couple projects (the work bag sew along we just finished and a couple others) that can be made with the directions I am putting on LiveBinder. This should be possible without signing up for an account.

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Looking for where to buy each of my books and patterns?

  • Fanciful Utility: Victorian Sewing Cases and Needle-books is available through ESC publishing at www.thesewingacademy.com
  • Paisley, Plaid, & Purled: Shawls of the Mid-Nineteenth Century is exclusively available in my Etsy shop as a Ebook.
  • From Field to Fashion: The Straw Bonnet is currently available as an Ebook in my Etsy shop.
  • My Quilted Winter Hood Pattern is also available in my Etsy shop.
Published in: on February 11, 2016 at 6:00 am  Comments (7)  

Alas, no home

These poor bonnets never did find a home last year. Each is waiting for the right time and person.

The first is one of my favorites from last year. I just love the combination of the velvet calla lilies and pink & green silk.

This is a smaller straw hat. (It fits my head perching forward.) It would be good for an adult with a smaller to average head or a child. Find it on Etsy.

This little hat is ideal for a late war to post war impression. Light weight, made of fine hemp-straw and silk, it sits back over the hair as it begins to rise. The inspiration for this bonnet comes from this 1865 wedding bonnet at the National Trust Collections (below) Find it on Etsy.

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**Note: I am going to make a point to share my millinery work here first as the listings are complete. This means, to get the first look and chance at pieces, subscribe to my blog. You can opt to have the new posts go to a feed or your email.**

 

 

 

Published in: on February 10, 2016 at 2:30 pm  Leave a Comment  

Sew Along – Work Bag (week6)

This week we are finishing our work bag by decorating with ruched ribbon, adding the ribbon handles and the wool needle pages for the cotton bag and adding a handle & draw for the silk bag.

Cotton Work Bag

To cut your wool needle pages, take the template from week 1 and trace this on a piece of paper. Trim the piece of paper down along the curved sides to the size and shape you like. Be sure to leave enough of the flat side for the fold to be a solid anchor. I trimmed about a half inch in from the edge for mine. This becomes the template for  your wool pages.

Fold the wool in half. Place your template on the fold. Mark around your template. Cut with pinking shears or a pinking machine. (Note – With a pinking machine, you will loose a tiny bit of the size.)

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Place the fold along the inside crease of the flap and front piece. With the pages open, sew through the fold and crease.  I suggest a set of stitches in the center and at each end.

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Here is a set of needle pages in place:

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Cut 2 12″ sections of ribbon and set them aside for the handles.

Box pleat the remaining ribbon in small box pleats (about a half inch.) You will need the pleated ribbon to be flexible because it will need to go around the curves easily. (See how my box pleats like to flop below.) You can pleat enough to go around the front flap of your bag. You may have enough to go around the back as well. (The original does not have this.)

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Sew through the box pleats and the very edge of the flap. I like to catch the top center of each box pleat and the bottom center as well.

Here is the flap trimmed in box pleats.

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For the handles, fold under each end about a quarter of an inch. Pin in place at the very edge of the pasteboard center. Sew around three sides (sides and bottom) going through the lining and catching the decorative fabric hidden inside.

Repeat with both handles. (front to front and back to back seems to work better. Though some originals have handles going front to back.)

Here is my finished cotton work bag. (You will notice I opted for self fabric handles as I somehow ended up a bit short on my length of ribbon. I suspect I used a bit for another project and forgot.)

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Silk Bag

The silk bag has just a few remaining steps.

Remember this channel that was made when we attached the lining and silk? We are simply going to run a silk ribbon or cord through it.

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For each side, cut between 12″ and 18″ depending on how long you want your handles to be.

I prefer to work a small hole in the base of the lining to access the channel.

 

Also use a bodkin or stiletto to work a hole in the top of the silk. You may want to do a fine button hole stitch around this hole.

I also use my bodkin to bring the ribbon/cord through the channel.

 

I anchor the ribbon/cord at the base of the channel. This could be done with a knot at each end or folding the end over.

 

Published in: on February 7, 2016 at 6:00 am  Leave a Comment  

A “I want that”

You know those times when you see an outfit in a photo, painting or illustration? This is one of those times. In this case, it is all Kitty Calash’s fault for mentioning The Yale Center for British Art in her Frivolous Friday post.

This ensemble in the center of Wilkie’s The Pedler instantly caught my attention. Often, when I see clothes, I envision how they would feel to wear them. This looks all too comfy to me.

I see a shorter red wool or linen skirt with what may be a deep hem/hem-backing or another shade of red as a trim or a tuck, a long sacque style bodice closing at a high waist with a belt,  from under the bodice hangs low a key and scissors, a kerchief with a border drapes around her neck, peeking out of the bodice/sacque is a white collar. As I know much less of this era, I am not quite sure what that white collar is. A chemisette?

For warmth, I would work the skirt/petti in wool and the bodice/sacque also in wool. For comfort in warmer weather, I would work the skirt in wool or linen with the sacque/bodice in something lighter. cotton? light linen?

The Pedler close up

(close-up) The Pedler, by Sir Davie Wilkie at The Yale Center for British Art.

Kneeling in the forefront, we have a back view of similarly tempting, comfy clothing.

We can see the side slit in her skirt. Her sacque style bodice is shorter, gathering in at a more natural location with the aid of the string/cord holding the blue cloth style apron in place. She has a smaller kerchief showing at her neck that almost appears to reach down the front of her, held under the blue cloth. I do like how that shade of blue is brought out by the golden color. (Lydia Jane, I think this is an outfit you will want to see.)

The Pedler close up

(close-up) The Pedler, by Sir Davie Wilkie at The Yale Center for British Art.

 

While visiting The Yale Center, be sure to look at First Class – The Meeting and Second Class – The Parting. Also, take a peek at Strange Faces. A story comes to mind for me. Besides that, she has a nice example of a turn over shawl and a bonnet.

 

Published in: on February 5, 2016 at 4:30 pm  Leave a Comment  

You must see this

I lack words for how much you must see this….

1746-1823 album with swatches, sketches, illustrations and notes.

 

***Please see Carolann’s note below in the comments about the published version of this.***

 

Published in: on February 5, 2016 at 1:00 am  Comments (4)  

Now Would be a Really Good Time

(Rescue furbaby needs meds)

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Published in: on February 3, 2016 at 7:00 am  Leave a Comment  

Sew Along – Work Bag (week5)

This week we are lining the bag and attaching the flap to the front. (only the cotton bag gets the flap)

Cotton Work Bag

Fold your lining fabric, right sides together, to roughly the right size for your work bag. Place the work bag on top of the fabric with at least a half inch from the top of the pasteboard. Mark around the edge of the fabric leaving enough space for a seam allowance.

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Cut out along the line you marked. (In my case, notice that the livingroom scissors are now not suited for any fabric after the wrapping of gifts.)2016-01-06-16.31.03-1.jpg.jpeg

If you wish to add pockets to your lining, do so now on the right sides.

With the right sides together, sew the curved edge of the lining fabrics together. Some may wish to do two rows of stitching for strength.

 

Fold and press about 1/2″ of the straight edge of the lining to the outside.

 

Slide the lining inside the work bag (right side out).

 

Line the fold of the lining up so it is just below the edge of the outer fabric and pasteboard. (1-2mm) Pin as needed to keep everything lined up.

 

With a blind stitch or whip stitch, attach the lining to the outer fabric and pasteboard.

Finished with the lining.

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The front flap attaches simply with a whip stitch through the flap layers of fabric and the front panel of the bag. You are just going through the fabric, not through the pasteboard. (I find it easier to start in the middle, work to one side > back across > back to the middle.)

 

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Silk Work Bag

Fold your lining fabric, right sides together, to roughly the right size for your work bag. Place the work bag on top of the fabric about a half inch from the top. Mark around the bag on the fabric leaving enough space for a seam allowance.

Cut out along the line you marked.

Cut a slit in from the top about 2.5″

 

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If you wish to add pockets to your lining, do so now on the right sides.

With the right sides together, sew the curved edge of the lining fabrics together. Some may wish to do two rows of stitching for strength.

Slide the lining inside the work bag (right side out).

 

Line the fold of the lining up so it is just below the edge of the outer fabric and pasteboard. (1-2mm) Pin as needed to keep everything lined up.

With a blind stitch or whip stitch, attach the lining to the outer fabric and pasteboard.

Finished with the lining.

Published in: on February 1, 2016 at 6:00 am  Comments (3)  

GVHSA – Pin Ball – Resources

 

 

Articles and blogging about originals:

Articles and blogging on making pin balls:

 

Needlework ideas and patterns:

 

Needlework helpers

 

 

Published in: on January 29, 2016 at 6:00 am  Leave a Comment  

Examples of a Turn-Over Shawl

A nice example of a Turn-Over Shawl is on Ebay this week. I hope they keep the photos up for a good long while.

A “Turn-Over Shawl” is A shawl that when folded in a triangle, shows all four finished borders. This is done by attaching 2 borders on the right side and 2 on the wrong side.

The three-quarter back view shows the Vs of the two border pairs. These are set on opposite sides so when folded over, both sets of borders form their Vs. You can see the “right side” construction of the top V in one of the photos. This shawl is made with a center piece of black wool, 4 paisley type borders and black wool borders that are frayed. The right and wrong sides of the paisley type borders can be seen in the other two photos. A border such as this one could have been purchased at the time.

 

There is another one over on Etsy as well. This shawl is 58″ square, within the common size perimeters for the mid-century. Again we can see the borders set in pairs on opposite sides so they will make Vs when the shawl is folded. While this border is narrower than the Ebay shawl’s, the way it is folded and photographed really shows how dramatic and lovely the look can be. The seller includes a teaser photo of one corner showing the right and wrong sides of the border. The color thread clearly shows the construction details. (btw – Please do not dry clean an antique shawl as the seller suggest.)

I believe Genteel Arts just did a workshop on making a turn-over shawl.

Additional examples:

http://www.meg-andrews.com/item-sold-details/Norwich-Turnover-Shawl/8011

http://www.clevelandart.org/art/2012.447

https://www.augusta-auction.com/component/auctions/?view=lot&id=14956&auction_file_id=33

http://www.powerhousemuseum.com/collection/database/?irn=149561

http://www.antique-textiles.net/shawls/1820-1825-turnover.html

Published in: on January 25, 2016 at 6:50 am  Comments (2)  
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